lalethnt

LCL Takes Malaria Fight to Bernard Farm

Posted on

first_imgThe Malaria Program of the Lutheran Church in Liberia (LCL) says there is an increasing rate of misuse of the treated mosquito nets, which are intended to protect people from mosquito bites, but are now being used for different purposes.The Director of the LCL’s Malaria Program said it is surprising that treated mosquito nets are not being used for their intended purposes in spite of the fact that the nets are an important tool for preventing the endemic sickness of malaria, which globally kills a child every 60 seconds.Dr. Moses Y. Harris told over 10 community leaders and other residents that the willful refusal of Liberians to use the mosquito nets has made the fight against malaria a challenging one for the country. The mission and vision of the LCL Malaria Program, according to Dr. Harris, is to end malaria deaths.He made the remarks over the weekend during a one-day awareness program on malaria prevention, held in Bernard Farm, which comprises of over 10 communities.He said the fight against malaria needs more than mosquito nets, therefore he urged community members to cooperate and stop the blatant refusal to use the nets for the right purpose and join the fight against malaria which he described as one of the deadliest diseases in the world.“Liberians know how to prevent malaria, but because we don’t want to do what we are supposed to do, we will keep getting sick,” Dr. Harris said.He pointed out that the appropriate use of the mosquito nets and clean environment are the surest ways to stop malaria.Dr. Harris said WHO has reported that about 24 percent of global disease is caused by environmental exposures, which he believes can be prevented.The report estimates that more than 33 percent of diseases in children under the age of five are caused by environmental exposures, said Dr. Harris. He also told the communities the insecticide treated bed nets should be washed once every three months with bathing soap and hung out to dry in a shade.The Regional Supervisor #1 of the LCL Malaria Program, Susan Larmouth, praised Bernard Farm Community residents for their support to the program.Some members of the communities have praised the LCL Malaria Program for raising awareness in their communities.One of three volunteer health workers who are trained by the LCL Malaria Program to provide malaria care in the communities were seen doing regular community household visits. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

LaLiga: Celta de Vigo 4-3 Barcelona: Barca lose thriller to stay fourth

Posted on

first_img It was a thriller at Balaidos Barcelona lost a thrilling encounter with Celta de Vigo 4-3 on Sunday evening to remain fourth place in LaLiga, two points behind leaders Atletico Madrid.The visitors were run ragged in the first half, going 3-0 down with goals from Pione Sisto, Iago Aspas and Jeremy Mathieu.Gerard Pique pulled one back for Barca early in the second half, before Neymar netted from the penalty spot to reduce the deficit to just one.But Celta again went two in front, Hernandez making the score 4-2 after a hilarious mistake from Marc-Andre ter Stegen in the Barcelona goal.Pique added his second of the game to make it 4-3 in the dying stages, but the visitors could not pull level before the final whistle.You can watch the goals below… 1last_img

Aberdeen have closed gap to Celtic, says Considine

Posted on

first_imgAberdeen defender Andy Considine said Sunday’s League Cup final loss to Celtic hurt acutely because the Dons have proven they are a match for the Hoops.Ryan Christie’s first-half strike made the difference at Hampden as Brendan Rodgers secured a seventh straight trophy since arriving in Glasgow.Considine rued the narrow loss, but said he was quick to remind his teammates after the defeat of the progress Derek McInnes’ side have made.He said: “In years gone by it was ‘It’s the Old Firm, it’s almost like if they win it doesn’t matter, we’ll go on to the next game’. “But I feel we are so close to them now. It hurts so much more because I feel we can go toe to toe with them.“We have shown we can beat them, both of them.”When asked what it took to beat the Glasgow pair, he added: “It’s about doing the basics well but at the same time, you only get three or four chances, and you need to be clinical.“That’s the big thing about facing the Old Firm, you’ve got to take your chances because they are fantastic teams. “There’s not a lot of lapses of concentration and when you do get that you need to tuck it away.”Aberdeen look to bounce back on Wednesday when they face Rangers at Ibrox.Considine insisted winning at the home of the new Premiership leaders would provide the perfect cure for any lingering League Cup hangover.“A result like this hurts but Wednesday night is massive,” he said. “This month is huge for us, nine games, and fingers crossed we can come through with flying colours.“If there was a way to make ourselves feel better, we’d go to a place like that and win.”last_img read more

Government to revise retirement age

Posted on

first_imgThe government are putting it on their agenda for 2017 to revise the retirement age for workers in both the public and private sector. The aim is to reduce age discrimination in the workplace and reduce government spending for the years ahead.The proposal, drafted by Minister for Mental Health and Older People Helen McEntee and Minister for Social Protection Leo Varadkar, is to make mandatory retirement ages illegal.Although there is not concrete compulsory retirement age in Ireland, the issue lies within the employment contracts in both private and public sectors which require people to retire at a specific age. The Sunday Independent report that people are to be incentivised into working for longer with the promise of a larger state pension, in an attempt to avoid the pension time bomb.For the first time, employers will need to provide a legitimate reason aside from age, for compulsory retirement.These proposals will also give people the chance to retire early on a reduced pension.Varadkar told the Sunday Independent that the aim is to provide “greater flexibility around retirement”, and that “we are also examining a change in the law that would put the onus on employers who want someone to retire before the State pension age, so that the employer would have to prove that this is necessary for some objective reason”. Minister McEntee added that “when they reach a certain age set out in an employment contract, most people have no option but to retire, even if it’s not what they want. I believe we must give people the option of working if that is what they want and if they have the ability to do so.”Government to revise retirement age was last modified: January 1st, 2017 by Elaine McCalligShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Football Fridays fever mounts

Posted on

first_imgSouth Africa’s 2010 mascot Zakumiinteracted with government employees atthe Football Fridays launch. Diski Dancers teaching governmentofficials the dance. Deputy health minister Molefi Sefularoblows on his vuvuzela. (Images: BonganiNkosi)MEDIA CONTACTS• Terrence Manase The Presidency+12 300 5436 or +27 82 338 6707RELATED ARTICLES• Peace football tournament for SA • Stadiums ‘on track’ for 2010• Get kitted for Football FridaysBongani NkosiThe South African government has thrown its full weight behind Football Fridays – a campaign to drum up support for national football squad Bafana Bafana ahead of the 2010 Fifa World Cup.Football Fridays was officially launched at the Union Buildings in Pretoria on 30 October 2009 and Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe was there to give his seal of approval.“We would like to make the call to all South Africans, especially public servants, to wear football jerseys every Friday in anticipation of this great celebration coming our way next year … the Football Friday concept is one such initiative that government fully supports,” he said.The drive was introduced in September by the International Marketing Council (IMC) and has since been encouraging the public to don shirts of their favourite team, be it Kaizer Chiefs or Manchester United, at the end of every working week.As the custodian of Brand South Africa, the IMC’s primary task is to promote the country as a destination “Alive with Possibility”.“Fly the Flag for Football”, of which Football Fridays is a part, and “Feel the Diski Rhythm: it’s time to celebrate 2010!” are further IMC initiatives designed to ignite football spirit in South Africa before the World Cup kicks off here in June next year.At Friday’s launch government officials and Union Buildings employees turned out in their droves to be introduced to Football Fridays in style. “We must ensure that every public servant wears their jersey every Friday,” said the Presidency’s chief operations officer Jesse Duarte.The intention is to get every working South African in his or her football jersey every Friday, including those in the private sector, where the initiative is already taking shape, said Irvin Khoza, chairperson of the 2010 Local Organising Committee.Besides getting the nation in the desired mood for an exciting tournament, Football Fridays will also inspire national unity that is “required to host a successful World Cup”.“Football Fridays is a brilliant concept. We encourage everybody to support it,” Irvin said.“We believe that [Football Fridays] will help us define our South Africanness,” said IMC CEO Paul Bannister.Bafana Bafana gears upFootball Fridays, said Sports and Recreation Minister Makhenkesi Stofile, is all about “laying a solid foundation to build a movement around Bafana Bafana”.The minister added that the initiative will go a long way in reigniting the spirit shown to the national team during the Fifa Confederations Cup in June 2009.Bafana, which had struggled during the eight matches in the run-up to the tournament, put in a sterling performance at the Confed Cup. It collected four points in the group stages and went on to lose 1-0 to Brazil in the semi-finals. Many a local football critic commended the team for their accomplishment.Just recently the South African Football Association reinstated Bafana’s former coach, Carlos Alberto Parreira, which will undoubtedly boost the squad’s morale.The Brazilian coach, who is famed for bringing brought World Cup victory to his country, is replacing fellow Brazilian Joel Santana who had a difficult time during his South African tenure.At the launch world football icon and former Bafana captain Lucas Radebe said South Africa’s recent below-par performance is not likely to continue into 2010. “I believe that this is a blessing in disguise … the team will really perform well at the right time. The players must know that they have the support of the nation.”But Bafana Bafana isn’t the only team South Africans are expected to support during next year’s spectacle: all African teams participating need the backing of the nation.To date Ghana and Ivory Coast have secured their places, alongside South Africa, which qualified automatically as the host nation. The last African nation to be represented at the World Cup has yet to qualify.Motlanthe was quick to congratulate the placing of the two West African teams, which look set to deliver a promising performance.“Bafana will not lack support, but we must ensure that the other African teams are largely backed … we call on all South Africans and Africans to come together as a one team,” Khoza said.“[It is] an event that will send a message to the world that Africa’s time has come,” he added.Welcoming the worldFootball Fridays also aims to inspire South Africans to give a warm welcome to international football fans and become top-notch hosts during the World Cup.“We must also ensure that those who come to our shores want to come back again. We must make them love South Africa,” said Stofile.To ensure a smooth and safe World Cup, government has invested R1.3-billion (US$164.9-million) to boost security in the country. As part of this, 41 000 police officers, including 10 000 reservists, will be deployed to monitor the month-long event. The officers will be supported by 10 000 staffers from various government departments to form the Joint Operational and Intelligence Structure.During next year’s World Cup dedicated investigation teams and special courts will be set up to deal with all football-related crimes on a 24-hour, seven-days-a-week basis, Motlanthe pointed out.The special courts and police stations will be set up close to host venues, “making processing and prosecutions much quicker, especially if or when a foreigner is affected”.“We have every confidence in our security establishment to secure this event,” he said.World Cup visitors will also be treated to a much-improved public transport system, made possible by government’s R11.7-billion ($1.48-billion) investment.The world-class Rea Vaya bus rapid transit system, already operational in Johannesburg, will be extended to the host cities of Cape Town, Pretoria/Tshwane and Port Elizabeth, while other modes of public transport are also being beefed up around the country.“I have no doubt that when the last whistle blows, our country and continent will never be the same again,” Motlanthe said.Time to Diski!With South Africa being a country of rhythm, there has to be a dance style to rouse excitement ahead of the 2010 spectacle – and the Diski Dance is there just for that. It will be the official theme dance for the nation during the tournament.All South Africans are encouraged to learn the dance, created by choreographer Wendy Ramokgadi.“I urge all of you to learn the Diski Dance as part of being a good host and welcoming the world in a celebratory style,” said Motlanthe.Groups of young dancers have been deployed across the country to teach the public the moves, said senior dancer Cassius Tlhotlhalamaja. “People are interested in Diski Dance. It is becoming a trademark,” he added.The dance, which imitates “diski” moves, is easy to learn, with the full version just five steps long. The entire piece can be performed in less than three minutes, experts say. “Diski” is a South African township slang word for football.The dance is also being promoted through commercial media, with a Diski Dance advertisement having already hit local television stations.“It’s our South African Macarena and our R Kelly step in the name of love,” Tlhotlhalamaja said.last_img read more

Long walk to university reaps the reward

Posted on

first_imgA man from Hanover Park in Cape Town walked a total of 34km every day to get to university, and go back home. His journey ended with graduation this week. Now he is putting to work and is teaching the next generation at a local school. Eric van der Byl proudly holds his Bachelor of Education degree after graduating this week. (Image: supplied) • South Africa’s Smart Schools showcased on Brand South Africa media tour • Kenyan gogo teaches her grandchildren a thing or two • South African policies help to reduce poverty, says World Bank • KZN pupils switch on the e-school • Storytelling takes centre stage Priya Pitamber In 2010, Eric van der Byl started studying at the University of the Western Cape (UWC). He had to walk 17km to campus and then 17km back home again each day because he could not afford transport.He did that for four years, through rain and cold, heat and sun. But his hard slog has paid off: Van der Byl graduated this week with his Bachelor of Education degree. Now 44, he was at a loss for words for a while, only able to say that the ceremony was unbelievable.But his effervescent personality came through when he was asked why he had persevered under such circumstances. “I had to become the source that could provide encouragement and help. My view is I could help and I did. In my second year, I became a mentor and tutor [at the university].”Van der Byl opted to study education because, as he described it, “teaching is the mother of all professions”. He is now teaching Grade 7 at Parkfields Primary in Hanover Park.He admitted he still had a lot to learn. “The first month has been very hectic,” he said. “I feel like a blind man. There is something new every day.” But the other staff members had been very helpful and the school “is wonderful”, he said. He marvelled at the teachers who operated like well-oiled machines. One day, he said, he wanted to be like them.“I believe in holistic education. It’s not just about teaching subject knowledge,” he told Cape Town newspaper, Cape Argus. “It’s about opening [students’] minds to all the possibilities that are out there for them. I see it as my main role to open their minds to the skills and talent and other potential that they possess.”Van der Byl was listed as a graduation highlight on the university’s website. “He has shown true spirit and determination in pursuing his goals, going as far as walking 17km daily to get to campus,” it read. “He, too, is already putting his qualification to use and is employed as a teacher…”Vice-chancellor Professor Tyrone Pretorius said: “This is indeed a very special occasion, not only because this is the first year I will be presiding over graduation ceremonies or that we are celebrating UWC’s 55th anniversary, but because I am proud of the calibre of graduates UWC has produced.“Being a socially responsible university, I have no doubt in my mind that this latest crop of graduates will go on to do amazing work for the betterment of not only South Africa, but the world at large.”Going forward, Van der Byl, a father of three, would like to pay off his study loans and perhaps pursue his postgraduate honours degree. “But I am not sure if I could balance everything now,” he said.His story has received a positive reaction from often cynical readers. In the comment section on the IOL website, Cynicalenigma wrote: “You give me hope, sir. If I had a kid, I would want you to be his/her teacher. Thank you.” Kgatle commented: “What a beautiful story. I imagine the kids that are taught by this hero will turn out okay indeed, just like their superhero teacher.” And Vuyo said it was a good story that made his day.last_img read more

Moniteau deputy hit by vehicle

Posted on

first_imgA Moniteau deputy is recovering this morning after being struck by a car on Thursday night.Officer Jason Partin was conducting a traffic stop when he was hit by a passing car driven by an 85-year-old.The Highway Patrol said Partin was taken to the hospital with moderate injuries. A passenger in the passing car was also taken to the hospital with injuries.Officials report both have been released from the hospital.last_img

Why Your Brain Loves That New Song

Posted on

first_imgWhen jazz legend John Coltrane first heard Charlie Parker play the saxophone, the music hit him “right between the eyes,” he once said. According to neuroscientists, Coltrane was exactly right. When we hear music that we like, even for the first time, a part of the brain’s reward system is activated, a new study has shown. The region, called the nucleus accumbens, determines how much we value the song—even predicting how much a person is willing to pay for the new track. “It’s a lovely, lovely piece of research,” says music psychologist David Huron of Ohio State University, Columbus, who was not involved in the study. The results will help scientists understand why humans attach so much value to abstract sequences of sound waves. “Music is one of those oddball things,” he says. “It’s not at all clear that it has any sort of survival value.” A favorite song, whether a power rock anthem or a soulful acoustic ballad, evokes a deep emotional response. Neuroscientist Valorie Salimpoor recalls once listening to Johannes Brahms’s “Hungarian Dance No. 5” while driving. The music moved her so profoundly that she had to pull over. Intrigued by the experience, Salimpoor joined Robert Zatorre at McGill University’s Montreal Neurological Institute in Canada to study how music affects the brain. In 2011, she and Zatorre confirmed that dopamine, a reward neurotransmitter, is the source of such intense experiences—the “chills”—associated with a favorite piece of music. They showed that listeners’ dopamine levels in pleasure centers surged during key passages of favorite music, but also just a moment before—as if the brain was anticipating the crescendo to come. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Salimpoor, now at the Rotman Research Institute in Toronto, Canada, wondered if the response was due to the music itself or to participants’ emotional attachment to it. She recruited 19 volunteers, 10 men and nine women aged 18 to 37, who shared self-reported musical tastes. “Indie” and “electronic” proved most popular. Salimpoor played 30-second samples of 60 songs they’d never heard before. Within an iTunes-like user interface, the volunteers then bid on how much they’d be willing to pay for each track, up to $2. To make the experiment more realistic, participants used their own money and received a CD of their purchased tracks at the end of the study. Salimpoor monitored how the volunteers’ brains reacted to the music using MRI. Multiple brain regions activated when they discovered a new favorite song, but only activity in the nucleus accumbens was well-correlated to how much the participants were willing to pay, she and colleagues report online today in Science. The nucleus accumbens is believed to be responsible for pleasant surprises, or “positive prediction error,” as neuroscientists call it. Our brains are well-suited to using patterns, such as the structure of music, to predict the future. “We’re constantly making predictions, even if we don’t know the music,” Salimpoor says. “We’re still predicting how it should unfold.” These predictions are based on past musical experience, so classical fans will have different expectations than punk devotees. But when the music turns out better than the brain expected, the nucleus accumbens fires off with delight. Salimpoor concluded that the nucleus accumbens works in concert with pattern recognition and higher-order thinking centers to assign value to music. Vinod Menon, a cognitive neuroscientist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, wonders if the presence of lyrics in some tracks introduced confounding variables. “We don’t know if it’s the musical sounds or the linguistic components that drove some of these effects,” he says. Salimpoor responds that previous research showed similar brain effects using only instrumental music. Lyrics, she says, did not appear to skew listener’s purchasing decisions. Next, Salimpoor will investigate another area of the brain, the superior temporal gyrus. She aims to discover how this region, which stores a record of the sounds we’ve heard, shapes our future musical preferences. Eat your heart out, Pandora.last_img read more

PM Modi to Attend EU-India Summit in Brussels

Posted on

first_imgPrime Minister Narendra Modi is expected to visit Belgium on 30 March to attend the European Union-India Summit being held after four years. Related Itemslast_img

Sania Mirza hits ace with fashion makeover

Posted on

first_imgShe may not be the brightest star on the tennis circuit currently, but Sania Mirza is surely making waves on what is an altogether new front for her.Trashed ruthlessly for her garish fashion sense over the years, Sania now seems to have developed a more elegant and flattering dressing style.On Sunday night, the tennis player was seen in a refreshing casual chic avatar at a movie theatre in Mumbai. Looking cosy on the arm of cricketer-husband Shoaib Malik, Sania wore a pair of dark denims, which she teamed with a pop art T-shirt, a trendy white cape and thong sandals.To add a touch of glamour to her otherwise informal look, the 25-year-old flashed her large diamond solitaires with a bright red patent leather Louis Vuitton bag and a matching belt reaffirming her status as a rising fashionista.Sania also seems to have lost more than a few kilos and all her baby fat, looking svelte and toned, maybe even a little underweight and gaunt – as compared to what she used to be.While in the past, she has often impressed the fashion police with her sporty chic look and trendy little tennis skirts on the court, her disastrous off- court appearances almost always served to negate her efforts and had her ending up all too often on the fashion faux pas list.Her choice of traditional Indian wear, especially during her wedding in April 2010, didn’t work in her favour either. Fashion designers criticised just about everything about her get- up, from her choice of jewellery, colour palette to the silhouettes.advertisementWhether it’s thanks to hubby Shoaib or all the free time on her hands, Sania’s slow and steady makeover in the style department is for all to see. A blessing for us as gone are her ill- fitted jeans, unsightly tight T-shirts, dreadful accessories and over- the- top make- up.If she continues in her glamorous endeavour, Sania may soon help swell India’s WAG (Wives and Girlfriends of sports personalities, for the uninitiated) club, which currently boasts of just one member, Mahesh Bhupathi’s better half Lara Dutta.last_img read more